Well, my print article’s latest draft is pretty much screwed as Honduras’s interim government has declared a 45-day state of emergency, suspending civil liberties and eliminating any hope of viable elections anytime soon. I’d criticized the UN for withdrawing support for those elections. It looks like they were totally right, though it might have been better to wait a bit longer. Cato blogger Juan Carlos Hidalgo’s take, identical to my own:

One of the most troubling aspects of the suspension of constitutional guarantees is that they effectively obstruct the development of a clean, free, and transparent election process. Let’s remember that Honduras is holding a presidential election on November 29th, and many regard this electoral process as the best way to solve the country’s political impasse, particularly at an international level.

There can’t be a free and transparent presidential election while basic constitutional rights have been suspended. By adopting these self-defeating measures, the interim government of Honduras is lending a hand to Zelaya and his international allies in their effort to disrupt the country’s election process.

I started out in June pretty supportive of the interim government. As I learn more details, the situation appears more ambiguous; and as the controversy drags on, both parties hew frighteningly closer to type. Zelaya’s an egotistical, power-hungry stuntman, and Micheletti et al. don’t know how to govern legitimately in a crisis. Now we’ll be lucky if Honduras doesn’t hold elections this year. With even more luck, it will hold them by October next.